Johns Hopkins Researchers Erase Human Brain Tumor Cells In Mice

Working with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that weeks of treatment with a repurposed FDA-approved drug halted the growth of — and ultimately left no detectable trace of — brain tumor cells taken from adult human patients.

The scientists targeted a mutation in the IDH1 gene first identified in human brain tumors called gliomas by a team of Johns Hopkins cancer researchers in 2008. This mutation was found in 70 to 80 percent of lower-grade and progressive forms of the brain cancer. The change occurs within a single spot along a string of thousands of genetic coding letters, and is disruptive enough to keep the seemingly innocuous protein from playing its role in converting glucose into energy. Instead, the mutation hijacks the protein to make a new molecule not normally found in the cell, which is apparently a linchpin in the process of forming and maintaining cancer cells.

Encouraged by the new findings, described online Sept. 16 in the open-access journal Oncotarget, the Johns Hopkins researchers say they want to work quickly to design a clinical trial to bring what they learned in mice to humans with gliomas. Despite the growing understanding of IDH1 mutant gliomas, the development of effective therapies has proven challenging, they say.

To read the full article from Johns Hopkins Medicine, please click here.

Share |
December 4, 2014 02:02 PM
Concert proceeds benefit Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure.
November 24, 2014 04:43 PM
ABC2-funded research in the news and a blog post by Al Musella, of the Musella Foundation, about Novocure's promising Optune trial results.
November 18, 2014 12:33 PM
Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure funded Duke University's early work on the vaccine.

Join us in our fight for a cure!